Stevland Hardaway Judkin – Stevie Wonder

 

Friday, Nov 3, 2:30-3 pm PST KPFA

Today we celebrate the musical contributions of Stevland Hardaway Judkins who for decades has delighted the disabled and non-disabled world with his music, commitment to blind and disability rights and to universal peace.

Of course, we are talking about Stevie Wonder who remains a fixture in popular American culture and to think that this is the same musician who presented us with “Fingertips, Part Two” in 1963.  Those years were the time of one-hit popular stars who faded away permanently; but not Stevie Wonder who endured and grew.

 

Eddie Ytuarte produced and hosts this program.

Share SHARE
Posted in Blind, Eddie Ytuarte, Music | Tagged , , | | Comments Off on Stevland Hardaway Judkin – Stevie Wonder

Sonoma County Fires and Disability

Friday, October 20, 2:30 pm PST on KPFA

Sharon Rae Robinson who lived with memory loss, Christina Hanson, a 27 year-old woman who used a wheelchair her entire life because of Spina Bifida, and other disabled people were among the 42 who died in the Northern Calif. fires in the last ten days.

Among the 20 thousand people who were evacuated in Santa Rosa were people from numerous assisted living and supportive group homes including 240 people from the Sonoma Developmental Center, 450 people from Oakmont assisted living facilities, and both the Sutter and Kaiser hospitals. A private school for autistic students of mixed income in the Wells Fargo Center burned down.

We talk with Lake Kowell, a staff member at Disability Services and Legal Center who lives with a spinal cord injury, has spent many days working in the Local Assistance and Evacuation Centers.

Some of the information we discuss in this program:

  1. Governor Brown’s veto of SB 649 which would have made it easier to build cell phone towers.

  2. Fire Fund for People with Disabilities.  The California Foundation for Independent Living Centers has established the Richard Devylder Disaster Relief Fund. Donations made to the fund will be used to assist survivors with disabilities across the state who have lost their critical mobility and accessibility devices such as wheelchairs, scooters, walkers, canes, hearing aids and communication devices in the fires.
  3. Gift Cards for people with disabilities.  Sterling Adaptives and Adaptive Technology Service will match donations. For very $10. you give, $30 will be given to people with disabilities. Mail cards to:
    62A Brookwood Avenue

    Santa Rosa, CA 95404
  4. Investigation of Varenna and Villa Capri licensed care facilities in the Oakmont Senior Living Development by the California Department of Social Services.  That department also does routine reviews of all assisted living facilities which were evacuated before people can return. (All 430 residents of these two care homes were evacuated safely.)
  5. Lake Kowell’s “Dancing with the Stars” performance.  A Raven Performing Arts Theater fundraiser, Saturday Nov 4, 7:30 pm.  Some proceeds to fire victims.
  6. Electronic Visit Verification could mean onerous new rules for IHSS workers, the people who help us live independent lives. The State of California is being pressured to comply with a new Federal mandate. It could require workers and people with disabilities to call into an electronic system as they move from task to task. It is being resisted. If you want to get involved in pushing back against these new rules, send me an e-mail at adrienne@sonic.net.

Produced by Adrienne Lauby.  Hosted by Shelley Berman and Adrienne Lauby.

 

Share SHARE
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Sonoma County Fires and Disability

Opposing Electronic Visit Verification, Statement & Document Links

Statement in Opposition and Questions about Electronic Visit Verification (EVV)

My name is Hannah Karpilow, I have been an IHSS worker since 1981 and I work for people in my community, not family. I have also been involved in recruiting and referring workers, for IHSS and private pay clients. Unfortunately, I have seen the IHSS program go from bad to worse in terms of bureaucratic incompetence. It is this incompetence and the scrutiny that we are subject to, that turns people away from working within the system. Adding this level of surveillance will only increase this problem, and at a time when we desperately need to be increasing the workforce to meet the needs of the aging population. 
 *
Besides the morality of this policy, I am not going to contribute suggestions on how to implement the Electronic Visit Verification because I see it as a completely fraudulent use of tax dollars no matter how it is rolled out. 
 *
I would like to get some numbers. Before you go to far with this, we should have an idea of what it will cost the taxpayers – both State and Federal. I understand the Feds will pick up 90% of the design and implementation, and 75% of the maintenance costs. It’s all taxpayers dollars. What is the ballpark range of the initial phase? What about ongoing? Surely some numbers are available based on other states’ costs. These need to be looked at closely and compared with two figures: One, the projected cost SAVINGS that the EVV is intended to net, based on fraud (real and perceived), and two, the penalties for non-compliance. 
 *
There’s also the question of why this is necessary when we have social workers who visit our clients to assess their needs and confirm that those needs are being met. Can’t we trust them to make accurate observations and assessments based on these visits? 
 *
Our great State of California has fought back against Federal legislation that regards people as criminals simply for being born in another country even when they were brought here as infants. This EVV legislation regards people as criminals simply for being poor and disabled or working in a job that is given such low status that in some cases we earn less than minimum wage. 
*
I urge the stakeholders and policy makers to consider scrapping the design phase and focus instead on how to repeal this legislation based on the civil rights laid out in the 1999 Olmstead Decision of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Clearly this policy is not for the benefit of home care recipients or providers, but for high paid consultants and technology companies to profit on our backs. 
 *
Share SHARE
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | | Comments Off on Opposing Electronic Visit Verification, Statement & Document Links

White Supremacy and Disability

Listen (29 min)

There has been a great deal of coverage of the alt-right neo-Nazi movement since the civil unrest in Charlottesville, Virginia but, despite the Nazi murder of 70 thousand people with disabilities in the period leading up to the Holocaust, little has been said about alt-right, neo-Nazi attitudes toward people with disabilities.

In this program, Nadin Abbott, from the website Reporting San Diego, an expert on this shadowy world, talks about the impact of the resurgent white supremacist movement on people with disabilities.

In May of this year, a nineteen year old man sexually assaulted a mentally disabled black teen in a football locker room.  He was given just 300 hours of community service with probation.  The case ended up on the website of the Southern Poverty Law Center, the organization which monitors hate groups and other extremists throughout the U.S.  How many other assaults, reported or not, are a result of the rise of alt-right?

Ms. Abbott holds a master’s degree in history from San Diego State University.  She was born and raised in Mexico City and is the daughter of a Holocaust survivor.

Mark Romoser and Sheela Gunn-Cushman produce and host the program.

Original air date: October 6, 2017

Share SHARE
Posted in Bullying, Community, Mark Romoser, Mental Disability, Research, Sheela Gunn Cushman, Violence | Tagged , , , , | | Comments Off on White Supremacy and Disability

Renters Assemble & “Telling My Story”

Listen (29 min)

Tenants gathered at a Statewide Renters Assembly in Alameda over the September 23-24 weekend.  Ava and Fernando Nadal were there, gearing up to lead an attack on the landlord demon law, Costa Hawkins* with ACCE Sacramento.  This, despite an impending loss of their home and Fernando’s upcoming major surgery.  Adrienne Lauby talks with them.

If you’ve been asked to “tell your story” to a funder or politician, stick around for Sheela Gunn-Cushman’s essay.  If you’ve ever asked a consumer, client
or constituent to “tell your story,” you must listen as Sheela explores the grueling, degrading and thankless nature of this activist tool many of us rely on. 

*Costa Hawkins is a state-wide law that limits the number, type and age of homes that can be covered by rent control.  It was passed in the late ’90s at the request of landlord and realtor groups.  Local groups working for rent control and just cause eviction find it a major barrier to success.

Protest of AirBnB

Hats off to a coalition of advocates for disabled people, seniors and tenants who rallied at the San Francisco headquarters of Airbnb on Oct.19.   Despite Airbnb’s $30 billion dollar market value, Airbnb’s hosts routinely discriminate against people with disabilities.   There’s nothing innovative or disruptive about discrimination, and there’s no law protecting a ‘platform’s’ right to embrace it.” Bob Planthold said, “Airbnb is a dominant player in the travel industry. It’s past time for the corporation to assume responsibility for ensuring all travelers have access to its accommodations.”

For more on this issue, contact Senior and Disability Action in San Francisco. Their phone is (415) 546-1333.

IHSS Draconian Restrictions on the Way

Due to new Federal requirements under the CURES Act, California will soon monitor the coming and going of In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) recipients and our care providers with some form of a call-in system for monitoring and tracking when an IHSS recipient’s care provider arrives to clock in and out for work, verifies the presence of the IHSS recipient, verifies or tracks the location of the recipient, and demands to know the services (tasks) rendered or delivered to the IHSS recipient during the providers’ working hours.  

There will be a series of stakeholder meetings in Sacramento to help plan these changes.  The first one is:

Thursday, Oct. 12
10 am – noon
CDSS, 744 P St.,
OB8, Room 235/237
Sacramento
If you plan to attend in person, RSVP Jeffery Berndt at jeffery.berndt@dss.ca.gov
To attend by phone, contact Kim Rutledge at Kim.Rutledge@dss.ca.gov

Those of us with disabilities who are IHSS recipients should look at these regulations and provide input and feedback as we will be impacted by this Big Brother regulatory oversight of our lives.  We can only presume that this paternalistic approach to monitoring the coming and going of our IHSS providers (and waiver providers) will result in an infringement of our freedom of mobility and how we will be forced to live our lives on a short leash or under some adverse system of tracking with calling in or out which is similar to a criminal wearing an ankle bracelet.

Axis Dance 30th Anniversary Performance

Hold the last weekend of Oct. The disabled and non-disabled, mixed-ability group, Axis Dance, is celebrating their 30th anniversary with performances titled “Onward and Upward.” It’s a program of three dances, including one by their new Artistic Director, Mark Brew. That one was created in collaboration with JooWan Kim, artistic director of the Hip-Hop Orchestra. That’s Axis Dance performances — the last week of October.

—–

This program produced and hosted by Sheela Gunn-Cushman and Adrienne Lauby.

Original Air Date: 9-29-17

Share SHARE
Posted in Activism, Adrienne Lauby, Community, IHSS, Politics, Sheela Gunn Cushman, Story Telling - Disability | Tagged , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Renters Assemble & “Telling My Story”

IHSS Changes- Stake Holder Meeting Oct. 12

Due to a new Federal requirement The CURES bill, California will soon monitor the coming and going of In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) recipients and our care providers with some form of a call-in system for monitoring and tracking when an IHSS recipient’s care provider arrives to clock in and out for work, verifies the presence of the IHSS recipient, verifies or tracks the location of the recipient, and demands to know the services (tasks) rendered or delivered to the IHSS recipient during the providers’ working hours.  

There will be a stakeholder meeting in Sacramento to help plan these changes.

Thursday, Oct. 12
10 a.m.-noon CDSS
744 P St.
Sacramento. OB 8, Room 235/237

If you plan to attend in person, please RSVP to jeffrey.berndt@dss.ca.gov
To attend by phone, contact: Kim Rutledge at Kim.Rutledge@dss.ca.gov

Those of us with disabilities who are IHSS recipients should look at these regulations and provide input and feedback as we will be impacted by this Big Brother regulatory oversight of our)lives. We can only presume that this paternalistic approach to monitoring the coming and going of our IHSS providers (and waiver providers) will result in an infringement of our freedom of mobility and how we will be forced to live our lives on a short leash or under some adverse system of tracking with calling in or out similar to a criminal wearing an ankle bracelet.

If the state fails to comply with these new regulations, the state will lose federal funding.

Thanks to Connie Arnold for this information.

Share SHARE
Posted in Accessibilty, Community, IHSS | Comments Off on IHSS Changes- Stake Holder Meeting Oct. 12

Taking a Stand: Helga Spizman & Anita Cameron

Friday, September 22, 2-3 pm PST, KPFA radio

Police march down the boulevard chanting “Whose Street? Our Street,” and Oklahoma City police gun down Magdiel Sanchez, a developmentally disabled deaf man, despite neighbors who yell, “He can’t hear you.”   All this in a week when the Republican congress hopes to pass a health care bill that will radically restructure and deeply cut Medicaid, health care for poor and disabled people.

Afraid yet?  It’s time to take a stand for ourselves and for each other.

This week, we’ll be talking to two women with disabilities who have taken a stand:  Helga Spizman, a activist holocaust survivor, and Anita Cameron, an ADAPT organizer who is headed to Washington D.C. this weekend to protest the Cassidy-Graham health care bill.

Young Helga Spizman spent World War II look for hiding places as her father obsessed about his decision to move to England, which he expected the Nazis to overrun.  After the Trump election, she attended the Women’s March and pussy hats emerged from her knitting needles like flowers popping up in the spring.

Anita Cameron, whose blog is called “Musings of an Angry Black Woman”, has been arrested a heroic 129 times in the non-violent struggle for justice. An organizer for ADAPT, the disability movement’s civil disobedience arm, she’s been involved in social change activism and community organizing for 36 years.

We talk to these role model women about their fears, their history and their expectations for something better. And, we’ll talk to you about supporting Pushing Limits by becoming a member of KPFA.

Produced by Shelley Berman and Adrienne Lauby. Hosted by the Pushing Limits collective.

Share SHARE
Posted in Activism, Adrienne Lauby, Arts, Community, Deaf, Developmental Disability, Disability Justice, Josh Elwood, Mark Romoser, Mental Disability, Police Violence, Politics, Protest, Race, Sheela Gunn Cushman, Shelley Berman, Story Telling - Disability | Tagged , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Taking a Stand: Helga Spizman & Anita Cameron

2018 Federal Budget with Lindsay Baran

Listen (28 min)

Trump has something special in mind for poor people and the disability community as he moves into the Federal budget season with a tax reform agenda.  Cuts!  We’re not talking about paring knife slices you usually notice over time.  It’s bayonets, weed wackers, bulldozers and tanks — that kind of cuts. 

What cuts Trump can get from his right wing, but fractured, majority in the legislature is an open question.  But, we need to know what he plans for the disability community and who is making plans to stand up to him.

We talk to Lindsay Baran, policy analyst with the National Council on Independent Living in Washington, D.C., for the answers.

With thoughts about AC Transit, the Alameda County bus system, from Josh Elwood.

Produced and hosted by Mark Romoser and Sheela Gunn-Cushman.

Original air date: 9-1-17

Share SHARE
Posted in Activism, Community, Economics, Josh Elwood, Mark Romoser, Politics, Protest, Sheela Gunn Cushman | Tagged | | Comments Off on 2018 Federal Budget with Lindsay Baran

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha

Listen (29 min)

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (she/they) is a queer disabled non-binary femme writer and cultural worker of Burger/ Tamil Sri Lankan and Irish/ Roma ascent is the guest. Her work has been widely published, most recently in The Deaf Poets Society, Glitter and Grit and Octavia’s Brood.  Her memoir, Dirty River: A Queer Femme of Color Dreaming Her Way Home was praised as a “gritty, glorious, multi-layered story of homecoming and self-healing.”

Currently a lead artist with the disability justice performance collective Sins Invalid, she teaches, performs and lectures across North America.

Primarily, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarashinha is a self-described weirdo who writes about survivorhood, disability justice, transformative justice, queer femme of color lives and Sri Lankan diaspora while sitting in her room.

Well. . . perhaps we will get some “weirdo” crip conversation when guest Leah Lakshmi teams up with Pushing Limits producer Eddie Ytuarte for this half hour interview.

Produced by Eddie Ytuarte.

original air date: 8-18-17

Share SHARE
Posted in Community, Disability Justice, Eddie Ytuarte, Poetry & Prose, Race, Sexuality, Story Telling - Disability | Tagged , , , , , | | Comments Off on Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha

Cripping “The Glass Menagerie” – Phoebe Fico

Listen (29 min)

Phoebe Fico, a disabled woman, is currently playing one of the classic disability theatrical roles, that of Laura in Tennessee Williams, “The Glass Menagerie.”  The production by Cal Shakes utilizes a multi-racial cast to portray the conflicts of this thinly-veiled autobiography set during Williams’ younger years.

Phoebe Fico, a disability activist and poet as well as an actor, joins us to discuss what has and has not changed since Williams penned this play in the early 1940s.

“The Glass Menagerie” is the story of Williams’ conflict between caring for his sister and moving into the larger world.  It became his breakthrough play.  After he left home, his sister was lobotomized and then she lived in an institution for the rest of her life.  What might have happened if he had stayed?

Williams, himself, was disabled.  As a child, he was too sick to attend public school and he suffered a mental breakdown shortly before leaving home for good.  How did his disability affect his decision to leave his mentally disabled sister behind?  What might have happened if he had connected with Laura about their shared experience rather than helping to identify her as  the family problem?

How do all these dynamics play out in a multi-racial world?  Williams was white but the multi-racial cast of this production forces us to consider what would have been different, (and what would have been the same), for a black family.

Williams was white but this refreshing multi-racial cast forces us to consider these questions as they play out in communities of color.

We talk to Phoebe Fico about these and other issues and we’ll listen to some of her poetry.

“The Glass Menagerie” is in its final weeks at the beautiful outdoor Bruns Amphitheater in Orinda, California. It plays every day except Monday through July 30 with a generous sprinkling of matinee performances.  For tickets and other information, go to www.calshakes.org.

Produced and hosted by Adrienne Lauby

Original air date: 7-21-17

Share SHARE
Posted in Adrienne Lauby, Mental Disability, Poetry & Prose | Tagged , , , | | Comments Off on Cripping “The Glass Menagerie” – Phoebe Fico